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Current Alzheimer Research

Editor-in-Chief

ISSN (Print): 1567-2050
ISSN (Online): 1875-5828

Review Article

Non-steroidal Anti-inflammatory Drugs as Candidates for the Prevention or Treatment of Alzheimer’s Disease: Do they Still Have a Role?

Author(s): Alberto Villarejo-Galende*, Marta González-Sánchez, Víctor A. Blanco-Palmero, Sara Llamas-Velasco and Julián Benito-León

Volume 17 , Issue 11 , 2020

Page: [1013 - 1022] Pages: 10

DOI: 10.2174/1567205017666201127163018

Price: $65

Abstract

Purpose of Review: To provide an updated analysis of the possible use of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) as treatments for Alzheimer´s disease (AD).

Recent Findings: Neuroinflammation in AD is an active field of research, with increasing evidence from basic and clinical studies for an involvement of innate or adaptive immune responses in the pathophysiology of AD. Few clinical trials with anti-inflammatory drugs have been performed in the last decade, with negative results.

Summary: Besides the information gathered from basic research, epidemiological studies have provided conflicting findings, with most case-control or prevalence studies suggesting an inverse relationship between NSAIDs use and AD, but divided results in prospective population-based incident cohort studies. Clinical trials with different NSAIDs are almost unanimous in reporting an absence of clear benefit in AD.

Conclusion: The modulation of inflammatory responses is a promising therapeutic strategy in AD. After three decades of research, it seems that conventional NSAIDs are not the best pharmacological option, both for their lack of clear effects and for an unfavorable side-effect profile in long-term treatment. The development of other anti-inflammatory drugs as candidate treatments in AD may benefit from the knowledge acquired with NSAIDs.

Keywords: NSAIDs, amyloid, Alzheimer´s disease, risk, clinical trials, anti-inflammatory drugs.

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