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Current Alzheimer Research

Editor-in-Chief

ISSN (Print): 1567-2050
ISSN (Online): 1875-5828

Research Article

Beneficial effect of minimal interference on item memory but not on source memory in Alzheimer's disease

Author(s): Dimitrios Kapogiannis and Mohamad El Haj*

Volume 15, Issue 11, 2018

Page: [1070 - 1076] Pages: 7

DOI: 10.2174/1567205015666180711105242

Price: $65

Abstract

Objectives: Research suggests beneficial effects of minimal interference on item memory in mild Alzheimer’s disease (AD). We conducted a study to test whether these beneficial effects extend to source memory, i.e., the ability to remember the episodic context in which an information was previously acquired.

Method: Twenty-six mild AD participants and 28 controls manipulated six objects or watched the experimenter manipulating six other objects. After immediate item recall (“what were the items?”) and source recall (“by whom the items were previously manipulated?”), an interference or a minimal interference condition was administrated. In the interference condition, participants were assessed with neuropsychological tests for 10 min. In the minimal interference condition, they rested alone in a dark and quiet room for 10 minutes. Both interference and minimal interference conditions were followed by the delayed recall, on which participants were asked to remember the previously-presented objects and their source.

Results: Higher item memory was observed following minimal interference than following interference in AD participants (p < .01) and controls (p < .01). Also, AD participants demonstrated higher item memory on immediate recall than following interference (p < .001) or minimal interference (p < .001); controls also demonstrated higher item memory on immediate recall than following interference (p < .001) or minimal interference (p < .001). Considering source memory, similar source memory was observed following interference and minimal interference in AD participants (p > .1) and controls (p > .1). Also, AD participants demonstrated higher source memory on immediate recall than following interference (p < .001) or minimal interference (p < .001); controls also demonstrated higher source memory on immediate recall than following interference (p < .001) or minimal interference (p < .001).

Conclusion: Failures of hippocampus-dependent associative or consolidation processes in AD may preclude benefits of minimal interference for source memory. Nevertheless, AD patients may show some capacity to retain simple material, should the material presentation be followed by short delays that are free of further stimuli.

Keywords: Alzheimer’s disease, hippocampus, memory, memory rehabilitation, minimal interference, source memory.


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