Brassinosteroids: Practical Applications in Agriculture and Human Health

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Brassinosteroids: Practical Applications in Agriculture and Human Health provides a comprehensive overview on the practical applications of brassinosteroids (BRs) in plant biology (including stress ...
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Current Scenario of Applications of Brassinosteroids in Human Welfare

Pp. 3-15 (13)

Renu Bhardwaj, Indu Sharma, Mukesh Kanwar, Neha Handa and Dhriti Kapoor

Abstract

Brassinosteroids (BRs) regulate plant growth and development and show structural similarities to animal steroidal lactones. They are ubiquitously distributed throughout plant kingdom and regulate a broad spectrum of plant developmental and physiological processes, including gene expression, cell division and expansion and differentiation at nanomolar to micromolar concentrations. Exogenous applications of BRs revealed their enhancing effects on yield and quality of crops, vegetables and fruits. Besides, BRs have also been reported to play a significant role in stress-protection in both biotic and abiotic stress in plants. Recently, BRs have attained worldwide attention for their bioactivities in diverse test systems as well as in agricultural applications. Burgeoning studies have divulged antiviral, antifungal, antiproliferative, antibacterial, neuroprotective and immunomodulatory properties of BRs in animal systems. In human cells, BRs and their analogues are reported to inhibit cell growth in cancer cell lines. Keeping in view the agricultural, stress protective and medicinal properties of BRs, they are emerging as potential candidates for use in human welfare.

Keywords:

Antiviral, agriculture, brassinolide, growth, immunomodulatory, phytohormones, stress protection.

Affiliation:

Department of Botanical and Environmental Sciences, Guru Nanak Dev University, Amritsar 143005, Punjab, India