Depressed Serum 25-Hydroxyvitamin D Levels Increase Hospital Stay and Alter Glucose Homeostasis in First-ever Ischemic Stroke

Author(s): Yuge Wang, Yanqiang Wang, Bingjun Zhang, Yinyao Lin, Sha Tan, Zhengqi Lu*

Journal Name: Current Neurovascular Research

Volume 16 , Issue 4 , 2019


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Abstract:

Background and Objective: Vitamin D deficiency is internationally recognized among the potentially modifiable risk factors for ischemic cardio-cerebrovascular diseases. However, the association between vitamin D deficiency and stroke morbidity or mortality remains insufficiently known. Our aim is to investigate their relevance to 25-hydroxyvitamin D [25(OH) D] levels and clinical severity and outcome after 3 months in first-ever ischemic stroke.

Methods: Retrospective analysis of 356 consecutive patients in first-ever ischemic stroke between 2013 and 2015. Serum 25(OH) D levels were measured at baseline. Stroke severity was assessed at admission using the National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS) score. Functional outcome after 3 months of onset was evaluated using the modified Rankin scale (mRS).

Results: Among the 356 enrolled patients, HbA1c was higher in insufficiency/deficiency group than that in the sufficiency group (6.3 ± 1.7 vs. 5.9 ± 1.1, p =0.015). The hospital stay was longer in insufficiency/deficiency group than that in the sufficiency group (11 (8-17) vs. 9.5 (7-13), p = 0.035). There was a significant inversed trend between serum 25(OH) D levels and hospital stay (OR 0.960, P = 0.031), using logistic regression.

Conclusion: 25(OH)D levels are associated with glucose homeostasis, 25(OH) D contributes to increase the length of hospital stay. Low serum 25-OHD level is an independent predictor for hospital stay in first-ever ischemic stroke. Vitamin D deficiency did not predict functional outcome in the span of 3 months.

Keywords: 25-hydroxyvitamin D, first-ever ischemic stroke, hospital stay, functional outcome, mortality, vitamin D.

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Article Details

VOLUME: 16
ISSUE: 4
Year: 2019
Published on: 23 December, 2019
Page: [340 - 347]
Pages: 8
DOI: 10.2174/1567202616666190924161947
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