Highly Cross-linked Starch and Modified Cellulose as Dietary Fibers, and their Acclimation Effect on Hydrogen Excretion in Rats

Author(s): Sadako Nakamura, Misa Yamate, Kenichi Tanabe, Sanae Osada, Tsuneyuki Oku*

Journal Name: Current Nutrition & Food Science

Volume 16 , Issue 4 , 2020


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Graphical Abstract:


Abstract:

Background: Highly cross-linked phosphate starch (HCPS) and modified cellulose (MC) were newly developed and modified dietary fiber materials to prevent lifestyle-related diseases.

Objective: We investigated the physiological property of HCPS and MC to be a dietary fiber.

Methods: HCPS was made from tapioca starch by polymerization in the presence of 0.5% phosphoric acid, and MC was made from cellulose, maltodextrin and karaya gum by high-speed mixing. In the present study, rats were raised on a diet containing 10% or 15% HCPS, or 10% MC for four weeks, and physical effects such as growth, organ weights, blood biomedical parameters, fecal weight, and hydrogen excretion were recorded.

Results: Growth was normal among all groups, and there was no significant difference in total body weight gain. Some organ weights including the adipose tissues differed slightly among groups, but no difference based on diet composition was observed. Blood biomedical parameters were normal and not significantly different among groups. Cecum tissue and content weights were significantly greater in the 15% HCPS, 10% MC, and 10% fructooligosaccharide (FOS) groups than in the control group, and fecal weight was significantly increased in the 10% and 15% HCPS, and 10% MC groups compared with the control group. Hydrogen excretion over 24 h was negligible when HCPS was administered orally to rats non-acclimatized to HCPS but increased significantly in rats acclimatized to 10% HCPS diet for one week.

Conclusion: We conclude that both HCPS and MC could be suitable for use as low energy bulking materials.

Keywords: Acclimatization, dietary fiber, fermentation, highly cross-linked phosphate starch, hydrogen excretion, modified cellulose.

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Article Details

VOLUME: 16
ISSUE: 4
Year: 2020
Published on: 12 July, 2020
Page: [616 - 624]
Pages: 9
DOI: 10.2174/1573401314666181112143530

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