Generic placeholder image

Current Neuropharmacology

Rome
(Italy)

">Editor-in-Chief

ISSN (Print): 1570-159X
ISSN (Online): 1875-6190

Review Article

Gut-Brain Axis in Gastric Mucosal Damage and Protection

Author(s): Dolores Sgambato, Annalisa Capuano, Maria Giuseppa Sullo, Agnese Miranda, Alessandro Federico and Marco Romano

Volume 14 , Issue 8 , 2016

Page: [959 - 966] Pages: 8

DOI: 10.2174/1570159X14666160223120742

Price: $65

Abstract

Background: The gut-brain axis plays a potential role in numerous physiological and pathological conditions. Several substances link stomach with central nervous system. In particular, hypothalamo-pituitary-adrenocortical axis, thyrotropinreleasing factor-containing nerve fibers and capsaicin-sensitive nerves are principal mediators of the harmful and protective central nervous system-mediated effects on gastric mucosa. Also, existing evidence indicates that nitric oxide, prostaglandins and calcitonin gene-related peptide play a role as final effectors of gastric protection.

Methods: We undertook a structured search of bibliographic databases for peerreviewed research literature with the aim of focusing on the role of gut-brain axis in gastric damage and protection. In particular, we examined manuscripts dealing with the role of steroids, thyrotropin-releasing hormone, prostaglandins, melatonin, hydrogen sulfide and peptides influencing food intake (i.e. leptin, cholecystokinin, peptide YY, central glucagon–like peptide-1, and ghrelin). Also, the role of GABAergic and glutamatergic pathways in gastric mucosal protection have been examined.

Results: We found and reviewed 61 peer-reviewed papers dealing with the major aspects related to the role of gut brain axis in gastric mucosal damage and protection.

Conclusions: A dense neuronal network links stomach with central nervous system and a number of neurotransmitters and peptides functionally and anatomically related to central nervous system play a major role in contributing to gastric mucosal integrity.

Exploiting the mechanisms underlying the connection between brain and gut may lead to a better understanding of the pathophysiology of gastric mucosal injury and to an improvement in the prevention and, eventually, management of gastric damage.

Keywords: CNS, gastric damage, gastric protection, gut-brain, hydrogen sulfide, melatonin, thyrotropin-releasing hormone.

Graphical Abstract

Rights & Permissions Print Export Cite as
© 2022 Bentham Science Publishers | Privacy Policy