Why So Few Drugs for Alzheimers Disease? Are Methods Failing Drugs? | BenthamScience

Why So Few Drugs for Alzheimers Disease? Are Methods Failing Drugs?

Author(s): R. E. Becker, N. H. Greig.

Journal Name: Current Alzheimer Research

Volume 7 , Issue 7 , 2010

Abstract:

Recent studies of Alzheimers disease (AD) and other neuropsychiatric drug developments raise questions whether failures of some drugs occur due to flaws in methods. In three case studies of recent AD drug development failures with phenserine, metrifonate, and tarenflurbil we identified methodological lapses able to account for the failures. Errors in complex systems such as drug developments are both almost inescapable due to human mistakes and most frequently hidden at the time of occurrence and thereafter. We propose preemptive error management as a preventive strategy to exclude or control error intrusions into neuropsychiatric drug developments. We illustrate the functions we anticipate for a preemptive error management preventive strategy with a checklist and identify the limitations of this aspect of the proposal with three drug examples. This strategy applies core scientific practices to insure the quality of data within the current context of AD drug development practices.

Keywords: Alzheimer's disease, Alzheimer clinical trial, error management, checklist, tarenflurabil, metrifonate, phenserine, tramiprosate, Reason's model, Tarenflurbil, anticholinesterase

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Article Details

VOLUME: 7
ISSUE: 7
Year: 2010
Page: [642 - 651]
Pages: 10
DOI: 10.2174/156720510793499075
Price: $58

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