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Current Cancer Drug Targets
ISSN (Print): 1568-0096
ISSN (Online): 1873-5576
VOLUME: 4
ISSUE: 2
DOI: 10.2174/1568009043481560      Price:  $58









Targeted Histone Deacetylase Inhibition for Cancer Therapy

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Author(s): D. M. Vigushin and R. C. Coombes
Pages 205-218 (14)
Abstract:
The histone deacetylase inhibitors are a new class of cytostatic agents that inhibit the proliferation of tumor cells in culture and in vivo by inducing cell cycle arrest, differentiation and / or apoptosis. Histone acetylation and deacetylation play important roles in the modulation of chromatin topology and the regulation of gene transcription. Histone deacetylase inhibition induces the accumulation of hyperacetylated nucleosome core histones in most regions of chromatin but affects the expression of only a small subset of genes, leading to transcriptional activation of some genes, but repression of an equal or larger number of other genes. Non-histone proteins such as transcription factors are also targets for acetylation with varying functional effects. Acetylation enhances the activity of some transcription factors such as the tumor suppressor p53 and the erythroid differentiation factor GATA-1 but may repress transcriptional activity of others including T cell factor and the co-activator ACTR. Recent studies in our laboratory and others have shown that the estrogen receptor α (ERα) can be hyperacetylated in response to histone deacetylase inhibition, suppressing ligand sensitivity and regulating transcriptional activation by histone deacetylase inhibitors. Conservation of the acetylated ERα motif in other nuclear receptors suggests that acetylation may play an important regulatory role in diverse nuclear receptor signaling functions. A number of structurally diverse histone deacetylase inhibitors have shown potent antitumor efficacy with little toxicity in vivo in animal models. Several compounds are currently in early phase clinical development as potential treatments for solid and hematological cancers both as monotherapy and in combination with cytotoxics and differentiation agents. This report reviews the biology and clinical development of histone deacetylase inhibitors for cancer therapy.
Keywords:
cytostatic, deacetylase, monotherapy, hematological, histone
Affiliation:
Department of Cancer Medicine, 6th Floor MRC Cyclotron Building, Imperial College, Hammersmith Campus, Du Cane Road, London W12 0NN, UK.