Current Nanoscience

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DNA Nanotechnology: A Rapidly Evolving Field

Author(s): Kyle Lund, Berea Williams, Yonggang Ke, Yan Liu, Hao Yan.

Abstract:

In recent years, a number of research groups have begun developing nanofabrication methods based on DNA self-assembly. DNA is an extraordinarily versatile material for designing nano-architectural motifs, due in large part to its programmable G-C and A-T base pairing into well-defined secondary structures. Today, DNA nanotechnology has evolved into a unique interdisciplinary field, between chemistry, physics, computer science, biology and materials science. This review surveys some recent research mostly based on the authors and their collaborators work. Biography: Kyle Lund received his B.A. degree in environmental science (chemistry) from the University of Montana-Western. He is currently working on his Ph.D. degree in chemistry from Arizona State University under the direction of Hao Yan. His research focuses on the self-assembly of DNA nanostructures in 2D and 3D. Berea Williamss undergraduate research focused on enzyme kinetics at Boise State University where she received her B.S. in chemistry in the spring of 2005. Currently, she is attending Arizona State University in pursuit of her PhD as a collaborative student between Profs. Hao Yan and John Chaput. Bereas research focus is bionanotechnology with an emphasis in directed molecular self-assembly. Yonggang Ke received a B.S. degree in chemistry from Peking University. He is currently working on his Ph.D. in chemistry at Arizona State University. His work focuses on DNA self-assembly, DNA crystallization, and other researches (e.g. protein detection) based on DNA nanotechnology. Yan Liu received a B.S. degree in physical chemistry from Shandong University. She obtained a Ph.D degree in chemistry from Columbia University in 2000 under the guidance of. Prof. Kenneth B. Eisenthal on nonlinear optical spectroscopy of surfaces. She did post-doctoral research in Rockefeller University on photobiology of bacteriorhodopsin and moved to Duke University in 2001 to study the physical and chemical properties of melanin with Prof. John D. Simon. She became an Assistant Research Professor in chemistry and biochemistry at Arizona State University in 2004. She is also a principle investigator in the center for single molecule biophysics at the Biodesign Institute of ASU. Hao Yan received a B.S. degree in chemistry from Shandong University. He obtained a Ph.D degree in chemistry from New York University in 2001 under the guidance of Nadrian C. Seeman. He was an Assistant Research Professor in Computer Science department at Duke University from 2001 to 2004. He became an Assistant Professor in chemistry and biochemistry at Arizona State University in 2004. He is also a principle investigator in the center for single molecule biophysics at the Biodesign Institute of ASU. Hao Yans research centers on self-assembly of nanostructures, particularly using DNA as an assembly element. His group is interested to use this new technology to develop molecular motors, sensors and templates for more complex nanostructural systems and biotechnology applications.

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Article Details

VOLUME: 2
ISSUE: 2
Year: 2006
Page: [113 - 122]
Pages: 10
DOI: 10.2174/157341306776875811
Price: $58