Change in Quality of Life of OSAHS Patients with Minimally Invasive Surgery or CPAP Therapy: A 2-year Retrospective, Singlecenter Parallel-group Study

Author(s): Xiao-Qing Zhang*, Xin Zhao, Pei-Wei Hong, Jin Zhou, Ping Zeng, Cong Liu, Xiaoying Li, Yang Zhao, Li-Qiong Jiang.

Journal Name: Current Molecular Medicine

Volume 20 , Issue 3 , 2020

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Abstract:

Background: By including untreated obstructive sleep apnea-hypopnea syndrome (OSAHS) patients as the control group, this study explores the influence of minimally invasive surgical treatment and continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) therapy on OSAHS patients, with the subjective and objective performance. The study also discusses their relationship, determines the effect factor, and provides a simple and practical method for evaluation of clinical efficacy.

Methods: A total of 90 OSAHS patients, who were diagnosed in the Sleep Disorders Diagnosis and Treatment Center of Sichuan Province from May 2014 to May 2016, were selected for the present study. These patients were divided into three groups: surgery group, CPAP group, and untreated group. These patients were followed up at six months, one year, and two years, respectively. The physiological indicators, clinical symptoms, degree of daytime sleepiness and quality of life were compared among these three groups. The daytime sleepiness and the quality of life before and after minimally invasive surgery and CPAP treatment were evaluated, and the subjective and objective efficacy of surgery and CPAP treatment was explored.

Results: Among these 90 patients, 11 (12.2%) patients had hypertension, while two (2.2%) patients had diabetes. The average AHI score was 50.53±23.39 per hour, and the mean minimum oxygen saturation and mean oxygen saturation was 71.25±14.16% and 90.13±5.90%, respectively. There were statistically significant differences in mouth breathing, morning sore throat and daytime sleepiness in the group having received surgery at 0.5 year and one year. In the CPAP group, there were statistically significant differences in mouth breathing, morning sore throat and daytime sleepiness at 0.5 year, one year and two years. Moreover, there were statistically significant differences in memory loss at one year and two years, and there were statistically significant differences in frequent nocturia at one year. The ESS value in the surgery group decreased at 0.5 year and one year, but increased at two years. The situation was the same in terms of the total points and in each dimension of the SF-36 paramter. The delta values of ESS among the three groups had statistical significance at 0.5 year, one year and two years, in which the CPAP group experienced the most changes, followed by the surgery group and the group received health education.

Conclusion: For minimally invasive surgery, CPAP therapy and health education can improve daytime sleepiness and quality of life. CPAP therapy was found to be the most effective, followed by minimally invasive surgery and provision of health education. However, the treatment of OSAHS should be comprehensive.

Keywords: OSAHS, minimally invasive surgery, CPAP, quality of life, sleep disorder, sleep.

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Article Details

VOLUME: 20
ISSUE: 3
Year: 2020
Page: [231 - 239]
Pages: 9
DOI: 10.2174/1566524019666191009150734
Price: $95

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