NSE, S100B and MMP9 Expression Following Reperfusion after Carotid Artery Stenting

Author(s): Xiaofan Yuan , Jianhong Wang , Duozi Wang , Shu Yang , Nengwei Yu , Fuqiang Guo* .

Journal Name: Current Neurovascular Research

Volume 16 , Issue 2 , 2019

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Abstract:

Objective: Previous studies have shown that the neuron-specific- enolase (NSE), S100B protein (S100B) and matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP9) are specific markers for studying cerebral injury. This study was aimed to demonstrate these biomarkers for their correlation with reperfusion after carotid artery stenting (CAS).

Methods: In this study, a total of 44 patients who were diagnosed unilateral carotid artery stenosis by digital subtraction angiography (DSA) and underwent CAS, were selected as the operation groups. The patients’ blood samples were collected at three different time points: T1, prior to operation; T2, next morning after operation (24 hours); T3, three days after operation (72 hours); All of the patients with the operation received computed tomography perfusion (CTP) at T1 and T3. The second group of 12 patients, who were excluded for carotid artery stenosis by DSA, were assigned to be the control group; Blood samples of these patients were collected at T1. The concentrations of NSE, S100B and MMP9 in serum from patients of both groups were detected by ELISA.

Results: All of the operations were implanted in stents successfully without complications. (1) After CAS, rCBF increased while rMTT and rTTP decreased. (2) The concentrations of NSE, S100B and MMP9 in the serum decreased gradually (T1>T2>T3). There was no significant difference between the control group and the operation group at T1 (P>0.05) on their concentrations of NSE, S100B and MMP9 in the serum. When compared among the operation groups, the concentrations of NSE, S100B and MMP9 in the serum at T1 and T3 showed significant difference (P<0.05). (3) Correlation analysis among the operation groups indicated that NSE, S100B, MMP9 and rCBF were positively correlated before operation (r = 0.69, 0.58 and 0.72, respectively, P < 0.05), as well as after operation (r = 0.75, 0.65 and 0.60, respectively, P < 0.05).

Conclusion: We concluded that the concentrations of NSE, S100B and MMP9 in serum decreased with the improvement of cerebral reperfusion after CAS. NSE, S100B and MMP9 can be used as laboratory biochemical markers to evaluate the improvement of reperfusion after CAS. The results very well complement the imaging methods, such as CTP.

Keywords: NSE, S100B, MMP9, reperfusion, CT perfusion, carotid artery stenting, carotid artery stenosis.

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Article Details

VOLUME: 16
ISSUE: 2
Year: 2019
Page: [129 - 134]
Pages: 6
DOI: 10.2174/1567202616666190321123515
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