Citalopram-Associated Alopecia: A Case Report and Brief Literature Review

Author(s): Joshua Hekmatjah*, Kinza Tareen, Ruqiya Shama Tareen.

Journal Name: Current Drug Safety

Volume 14 , Issue 2 , 2019

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Graphical Abstract:


Abstract:

Background: Selective Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitors (SSRIs) are the first-line treatments for various psychiatric disorders. SSRIs offer an improved side effect profile compared to older treatments, which improves patients’ adherence and quality of life.

Case Report: Here we discuss a case of an uncommon, but a distressing side effect of citalopram. A 76-year old woman was referred to the psychiatry clinic for bizarre behavior. The patient was diagnosed with behavioral variant frontotemporal dementia and was started on citalopram 20 mg and aripiprazole 5 mg daily. At 3.5 months the patient complained of diffuse hair thinning on her scalp. Citalopram was considered the offending agent and was discontinued. Within a few months, the patient regained most of her hair. Although drug-induced alopecia is common among other SSRIs, it is relatively rare with citalopram.

Results and Conclusion: Early recognition, withdrawal of offending agent, and reassurance to the patient that hair loss is reversible can help alleviate patient distress and avoid relapse.

Keywords: Alopecia, SSRIs, adverse drug reactions, citalopram, VIGIBASE, Fluoxetine.

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Article Details

VOLUME: 14
ISSUE: 2
Year: 2019
Page: [167 - 170]
Pages: 4
DOI: 10.2174/1574886314666190215115857
Price: $58

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