Depression Rises the Risk of Hypertension Incidence: Discussing the Link through the Ca2+/cAMP Signalling

Author(s): Leandro B. Bergantin*.

Journal Name: Current Hypertension Reviews

Volume 16 , Issue 1 , 2020

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Abstract:

Background: Depression and hypertension are medical problems both with clearly restricted pharmacotherapies, along with a high prevalence around the world. In fact, an intensive discussion in the field is that a dysregulation of the intracellular Ca2+ homeostasis (e.g. excess of intracellular Ca2+) contributes to the pathogenesis of both hypertension and depression. Furthermore, depression rises the risk of hypertension incidence. Indeed, several data support the concept that depression is an independent risk issue for hypertension.

Conclusion: Then, which are the possible cellular mechanisms involved in this link between depression and hypertension? Considering our previous reports about the Ca2+ and cAMP signalling pathways (Ca2+/cAMP signalling), in this review I have discussed the virtual involvement of the Ca2+/cAMP signalling in this link (between depression and hypertension). Then, it is important to consider depression into account during the process of prevention, and treatment, of hypertension.

Keywords: Depression, hypertension, Ca2+/cAMP signaling, prevention, treatment, Ca2+ homeostasis.

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Article Details

VOLUME: 16
ISSUE: 1
Year: 2020
Page: [73 - 78]
Pages: 6
DOI: 10.2174/1573402115666190116095223

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