Importance of Oral Health in Pregnancy: A Mini-symposium

Author(s): Aditi Priyamvara, Amit K. Dey, Antara Bagchi, Raveena Kelkar, Rajaram Sharma*.

Journal Name: Current Women`s Health Reviews

Volume 15 , Issue 3 , 2019

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Abstract:

Background: It is known that hormonal imbalances during pregnancy make women more susceptible to dental problems. High levels of progesterone and estrogen during pregnancy, lead to an increased inflammatory response to dental plaque thus causing predisposing to gum diseases such as gingivitis. If untreated, gingivitis leads to chronic periodontitis which may manifest systemically in form of cardiovascular, endocrine or even respiratory disorders. Also, hyperacidity in the oral cavity due to gastric reflux and vomiting leads to decreased pH thus damaging the tooth enamel making the oral cavity more prone to tooth decay and tooth loss. Studies also show that periodontal disease can also lead to adverse pregnancy outcomes such as pre-term and low birth weight babies.

Objectives: We sought to understand the role of oral health in pregnancy.

Methods: We identified major articles of interest in the field of oral health in pregnancy and drafted a mini-symposium based on relevant information.

Conclusion: Regular dental visits and cognizant efforts to sustain a healthy oral environment can help women in the prevention and treatment of dental issues during pregnancy. The paper highlights the common oral manifestations during pregnancy and their local and systemic impact on the body during pregnancy. Furthermore, it also emphasizes the importance of good oral health practices to counteract the oral complications and the significance of oral health awareness in pregnant women.

Keywords: Pregnancy, oral health, cardiovascular, periodontitis, hormonal imbalances, hyperacidity.

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Article Details

VOLUME: 15
ISSUE: 3
Year: 2019
Page: [156 - 158]
Pages: 3
DOI: 10.2174/1573404815666190107095920
Price: $58

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