Prevention of Infection in Adults Receiving Intravenous Antibiotic Treatment via Indwelling Central Venous Access Devices

Author(s): Basant K. Puri * , Anne Derham , Jean A. Monro .

Journal Name: Reviews on Recent Clinical Trials

Volume 14 , Issue 1 , 2019

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Graphical Abstract:


Abstract:

Background: The use of indwelling Central Venous Access Devices (CVADs) is associated with the development of bloodstream infections. When CVADs are used to administer systemic antibiotics, particularly second- or higher-generation cephalosporins, there is a particular risk of developing Clostridium difficile infection. The overall bloodstream infection rate is estimated to be around 1.74 per 1000 Central Venous Catheter (CVC)-days.

Objective: We hypothesised that daily oral administration of the anion-binding resin colestyramine (cholestyramine) would help prevent infections in those receiving intravenous antibiotic treatment via CVADs.

Method: A small case series is described of adult patients who received regular intravenous antibiotic treatment (ceftriaxone, daptomycin or vancomycin) for up to 40 weeks via indwelling CVADs; this represented a total of 357 CVC-days. In addition to following well-established strategies to prevent C. difficile infection, during the course of the intravenous antibiotic treatment the patients also received daily oral supplementation with 4 g colestyramine.

Results: There were no untoward infectious events. In particular, none of the patients developed any symptoms or signs of C. difficile infection, whereas approximately one case of a bloodstream infection would have been expected.

Conclusion: It is suggested that oral colestyramine supplementation may help prevent such infection through its ability to bind C. difficile toxin A (TcdA) and C. difficile toxin B (TcdB); these toxins are able to gain entry into host cells through receptor-mediated endocytosis, while anti-toxin antibody responses to TcdA and TcdB have been shown to induce protection against C. difficile infection sequelae.

Keywords: Ceftriaxone, central venous access device, Clostridium difficile infection, colestyramine, daptomycin, vancomycin.

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Article Details

VOLUME: 14
ISSUE: 1
Year: 2019
Page: [47 - 49]
Pages: 3
DOI: 10.2174/1574887113666180817125036
Price: $58

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