Effect of Honey & Olive Oil Supplemented Bio-Yoghurt Feeding on Lipid Profile, Blood Glucose and Hematological Parameters in Rats

Author(s): Magdy M. Ismail*, El-Tahra M. Ammar, Abd El-Wahab E. Khalil, Mohamed Z. Eid.

Journal Name: Current Nutrition & Food Science

Volume 15 , Issue 2 , 2019

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Abstract:

Background and Objective: Yoghurt, especially bio-yoghurt has long been recognized as a product with many health benefits for consumers. Also, honey and olive oil have considerable nutritional and health effects. So, the effect of administration of yoghurt made using ABT culture and fortified with honey (2 and 6%), olive oil (1 and 4%) or honey + olive oil (2+1 and 6+4% respectively) on some biological and hematological properties of rats was investigated.

Methods: The body weight gain, serum lipid level, blood glucose level, serum creatinine level, Glutamic Oxaloacetic Transaminase (GOT) activity, Glutamic Pyruvic Transaminase (GPT) activity, leukocytes and lymphocytes counts of rats were evaluated.

Results: Blending of bio-yoghurt with rats' diet improved body weight gain. Concentrations of Total plasma Cholesterol (TC), High-Density Lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL), Low-Density Lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL), Very Low-Density Lipoprotein cholesterol (VLDL) and Triglycerides (TG) significantly lowered in plasma of rats fed bio-yoghurt. Levels of TC, LDL, VLDL, and TG also decreased in rat groups feed bio-yoghurt supplemented with honey and olive oil. LDL concentrations were reduced by 10.32, 18.51, 34.17, 22.48, 43.30% in plasma of rats fed classic starter yoghurt, ABT yoghurt, ABT yoghurt contained 6% honey, ABT yoghurt contained 4% olive oil and ABT yoghurt contained 6% honey + 4% olive oil respectively. The blood glucose, serum creatinine, GOT and GPT values of rats decreased while white blood cells and lymphocytes counts increased by feeding bioyoghurt contained honey and olive oil.

Conclusion: The findings enhanced the multiple therapeutic effects of bio-yoghurt supplemented with honey and olive oil.

Keywords: Bio-yoghurt, blood glucose, cholesterol, GOT, GPT, honey, olive oil.

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Article Details

VOLUME: 15
ISSUE: 2
Year: 2019
Page: [140 - 147]
Pages: 8
DOI: 10.2174/1573401313666170905160124
Price: $58

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