Current Diabetes Reviews

Norman E. Cameron
University of Aberdeen
Aberdeen, Scotland


Underlying Pathways for Interferon Risk to Type II Diabetes Mellitus

Author(s): Nabil Abdel-Hamid, Taghreed Al Jubori, Amaal Farhan, Mariam Mahrous, Adel Gouri, Ezzat Awad and Johannes Breuss

Affiliation: Dean of College of Pharmacy, Kafrelsheikh University, Egypt.


It has been known that chronic liver treatments interfere with blood glucose metabolism. It was recognized that diabetes mellitus among chronic hepatitis C was greater in other types of chronic liver diseases. Hepatitis C directly promotes insulin resistance through the proteosomal degradation of insulin resistance substrate. It suppressed hepatocyte glucose uptake through down-regulation of surface expression of glucose transporter. Long-term exposure to cytokine over expression seems to be cytotoxic to both beta cells of the pancreas and to hepatocytes. Elevated tumor necrosis factor-a, or its neutralization, increased insulin sensitivity. Interferon-a may also elevate the serum level of interleukin-1 which is cytotoxic to pancreatic islet cells. Both Diabetes mellitus and resistance to interferon-a therapy are abnormally mediated by over-expression of suppressor of cytokine signaling-1 in hepatocytes of chronic hepatitis C patients.

Conclusion: These data suggest that interferon-a therapy should be administered with caution in patients showing any predisposition to Diabetes mellitus. Anti inflammatory therapy is critically recommended as a protector against disease development due to cytokine mediated Diabetes mellitus during hepatitis C therapy, since inflammation seems to be a main candidate to interferon suspected diabetogenesis.

Keywords: Diabetes mellitus, HCV, inflammatory mediators, molecular mediators, anti inflammatory.

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Article Details

Page: [472 - 477]
Pages: 6
DOI: 10.2174/15733998113096660080